Physical Therapy: Total Hip Arthroplasty: Current Concepts in Pre- and Postsurgical PT
8.00
Online
Elective
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About the Course:
This intermediate-level course is relevant for physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) who are new to the field of orthopedics as well as more seasoned counterparts. With many changes in the total hip arthroplasty (THA) procedure, such as the surgical approach used, variations in different materials for the prostheses, and updates in the fixation methods used, it is important that the clinician be aware of these changes when working with patients who have undergone THA. Additionally, clinicians should be aware of the growing body of research supporting the role of PT both pre- and postoperatively with this growing population.

Course Objectives:
1. Identify the relevant anatomy of the hip and its significance in total hip arthroplasty (THA).
2. Describe the differential diagnosis of other hip conditions and indications for THA surgery.
3. Describe the clinically relevant details of THA surgery, including different approaches and complications.
4. Identify evidence-based approaches to preoperative physical therapy.
5. Discuss evidence-based postoperative physical therapy examination, interventions, and appropriate outcomes measures. 

About the Author:
Emily Slaven, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT, received a bachelor of physiotherapy degree from University College Dublin, Ireland in 1996 and a master of physiotherapy degree from University of Manchester in 2001. After practicing for several years in Indiana as a physical therapist in an orthopedic outpatient setting where she worked with a large caseload of patients who had undergone joint arthroplasty, Dr. Slaven developed an interest in being able to better quantify motion following lower joint arthroplasty. She completed a masters degree in biomechanics from Ball State University, Indiana in 2008 and a PhD in physical therapy from Nova Southeastern University in 2010. The topic of her PhD dissertation was “Prediction of Functional Outcome at Six Months Following Total Hip Replacement.” This study was published in Physical Therapy Journal and several presentations of different aspects of the study were presented nationally. Additionally, Dr. Slaven has completed the American Physical Therapy Association’s Orthopedic Clinical Specialization examination and a fellowship in manual therapy at Duke University Medical Center, North Carolina.
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Total Hip Arthroplasty: Current Concepts in Pre- and Postsurgical PT

8.00
About the Course:
This intermediate-level course is relevant for physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) who are new to the field of orthopedics as well as more seasoned counterparts. With many changes in the total hip arthroplasty (THA) procedure, such as the surgical approach used, variations in different materials for the prostheses, and updates in the fixation methods used, it is important that the clinician be aware of these changes when working with patients who have undergone THA. Additionally, clinicians should be aware of the growing body of research supporting the role of PT both pre- and postoperatively with this growing population.

Course Objectives:
1. Identify the relevant anatomy of the hip and its significance in total hip arthroplasty (THA).
2. Describe the differential diagnosis of other hip conditions and indications for THA surgery.
3. Describe the clinically relevant details of THA surgery, including different approaches and complications.
4. Identify evidence-based approaches to preoperative physical therapy.
5. Discuss evidence-based postoperative physical therapy examination, interventions, and appropriate outcomes measures. 

About the Author:
Emily Slaven, PT, PhD, OCS, FAAOMPT, received a bachelor of physiotherapy degree from University College Dublin, Ireland in 1996 and a master of physiotherapy degree from University of Manchester in 2001. After practicing for several years in Indiana as a physical therapist in an orthopedic outpatient setting where she worked with a large caseload of patients who had undergone joint arthroplasty, Dr. Slaven developed an interest in being able to better quantify motion following lower joint arthroplasty. She completed a masters degree in biomechanics from Ball State University, Indiana in 2008 and a PhD in physical therapy from Nova Southeastern University in 2010. The topic of her PhD dissertation was “Prediction of Functional Outcome at Six Months Following Total Hip Replacement.” This study was published in Physical Therapy Journal and several presentations of different aspects of the study were presented nationally. Additionally, Dr. Slaven has completed the American Physical Therapy Association’s Orthopedic Clinical Specialization examination and a fellowship in manual therapy at Duke University Medical Center, North Carolina.